INSPIRE

The Evolution of Cameras Through X-Rays

X-rays show us the bones of a subject, the fundamentals, the foundation our our bodies. American photographer Kent Krugh has changed the job of the radiograph machine to instead take ultraviolet rays of all different types of cameras. Going back to their origins and essential aspects to be able to dissect them by their interior characteristics.This work uses x-rays to explore the 'micro-evolution' of cameras and is a metaphor about the limits of evolution.

Although their form and media may have changed, the camera is still a camera. It continues to hold, maybe even stronger than ever, the tool to create images by capturing photons of light. Krugh's project called Speciation is a series of X-ray photos of cameras that provides a brief history of photography, as told through the evolution of the camera. Speciation is the process where new species can arise when populations are re-productively isolated. This project is a tribute to the cameras he owned, used or handled at one point in time. 

The Speciation: Still A Camera exhibition is on view at Panopticon Gallery through June 27! 

Kent  Krugh said, "While making these x-rays, I  have been surprised and astonished by what I found inside the cameras. The lens, when imaged from the side, contain a multi-element train of perfectly shaped glass forms. And although I have heard them turning but never saw them, gears and cogs are revealed."

Kodak No 3 Folding Brownie (1905-1915)

Kodak No 3 Folding Hawkeye Model 7 (1910-1912)

 

Leica IIIc (1933)

 

Graflex Speed Graphic Miniature (1939-1946)

 

Argus C3 (1939-1966)

 

 

Kodak Pony II (1957-1962)

 

Yashica 44 (1958-1960)

 

Kodak Brownie Starmatic (1959-1963)

 

Polaroid Swinger (1965- 1970)

 

Minolta Autopak 800 (1969)

 

Hasselblad 500CM (1970-1994)


Holga 120N (1982-2015)

 

Nikon D300 (2007-2009)

All Photo Credits: Kent Krugh 

 

03 May 2018 by Lisa Scarpa

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