INSPIRE

National Geographic Shows Us How Adorable Animals Are When They Sleep

The Magazine known for believeing in the power of science, exploration and storytelling to change the world, National Geographic, has been the source of telling stories that matter since 1888. However, National Geographic began taking pictures of animals in the July 1906 issue where they featured their first pictures of wildlife ever! 112 years later, National Geographic is one of the most highly praised researchers and photographers of our planet and the animals that live on it. "Through the world’s best scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, National Geographic captivates and entertains a global community through television channels, magazines, children’s media, travel expeditions, books, maps, consumer products, location-based entertainment and experiences, and some of the most engaging digital and social media platforms in the world."

They are also a non-profit organization that's devoted to the exploring and protecting of our planet! They fund hundreds of projects and make it a priority to educate the following generations on the beauitufl world we need to continue to protect with all the best resources we have. If these pictures of animals sleeping don't make you want to donate, I don't know what else could! 

A female leopard basks in the afternoon sun in Mombo, Botswana.

PHOTOGRAPH BY P. WARNER, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

 

The key to photographing wildlife is patience. Wild animals are going to do what they’re going to do. Unfortunately, you can’t ask the animals to look at the camera or turn in a certain pose, or smile. You have to be there, be ready and when they decide they want to do something worth photographing, you have to release that shutter, because it may not last long. You have stay prepared and be ready to wait. Photographers say it takes a long time to get good wildlife shots, even longer to make great ones. 

But as they say, the more time you spend with the animals, the most you begin to realize their habits and tendencies. The more you wait, the more intimate and close your photos will be. It goes the same with photography of a human as well. The comfort level can change the picture by a million words.

Fun Fact: Scientists haven’t fully figured out why we or other animals need sleep but we certainly do a lot of in our lives. Along with dreaming as well. Which we now know animals dream! Fish and insects don’t dream however, they don’t fall into REM sleep. Even the way that an animal snoozes can be different. Interestingly, horses, cows, and giraffes can sleep while standing, but need to lie down for short stints for REM sleep. Dolphins, as well as some other aquatic mammals and some birds, utilize something called unihemispheric slow-wave sleep. This allows one half of the sleep while the other remains awake so that long, non-stop migrations are possible.

"I caught this little guy dozing at the boat dock in Valdez, Alaska," writes Your Shot photographer Joianna Carson. "He seemed to be oblivious to everything that was going on around him."

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOIANNA CARSON, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Your Shot photographer Senthi Aathavan Sethiverl captured this moment between a baby monkey and its mother at the Katagamuwa Sanctuary in Sri Lanka.

PHOTOGRAPH BY SENTHI AATHAVAN SENTHILVERL, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

An orphaned sloth takes a nap at the Jaguar Rescue Center in Costa Rica.

PHOTOGRAPH BY IGNACIO CANALES, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A pair of tern chicks sleep side by side on the beach at Stump Pass State Park, Florida.

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHERYL ARENA (MOLENNOR), NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC 

In the Indian Ocean, a group of more than 30 adult sperm whales are sleeping at a depth of 15 meters. They stand like this without moving for minutes or hours. All are females, and all the calfs are at the surface while parents are sleeping.

PHOTOGRAPH BY STEPHANE GRANZOTTO, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

"I saw this teeny-tiny baby chameleon sleep-hanging on a plant, while walking back to my tent at night in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar," writes Your Shot photographer S.R. "Rather than blast the little guy with a flash, I used my headlamp to illuminate it and took this shot."

PHOTOGRAPH BY S R., NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

An arctic fox sleeps in his den.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ASHLEY FALLS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A pride of lions sleeps together in the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ALI SAIFALDEEN, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A slumbering leopard drapes itself across a tree branch.

PHOTOGRAPH BY SUDHIR SHIVARAM, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A polar bear gets some sleep before heading out onto the sea ice.

PHOTOGRAPH BY M. THEO, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Japanese macaques take a rest in thermal hot springs in Nagano, Japan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ISTVAN HERNADI, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

An owl catches a wink of sleep while taking in the early morning rays in Bangalore, India. "The raised leg gives the impression of a monk in meditation," observed Your Shot photographer Girish Prahalad.

PHOTOGRAPH BY GIRISH PRAHALAD, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A pair of red foxes take a rest.

PHOTOGRAPH BY KARL ADAMI, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A koala dozes in a tree in the suburbs of New South Wales, Australia.

PHOTOGRAPH BY FARHAD VEDAD, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

"Just a lovely sleeping seal," writes Your Shot photographer Vladimir Snegov.

PHOTOGRAPH BY VLADIMIR SNEGOV, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

While traveling in Alaska I stopped at the Alaskan Wildlife Refuge and had the opportunity to watch the Grizzly bears playing the water. This one bear decided he needed a nap so he climbed up on this log, lay down and fell asleep," writes Your Shot photographer Carol Bock.

PHOTOGRAPH BY CAROL S BOCK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A gosling nestles under the wing of its mother along the shore of a pond in Alberta, Canada.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JOE CHOWANIEC, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Cheetah cubs have a nap in Cape Town, South Africa.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TARYN PATERSON, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

"These hippo have found the best way to sleep through the morning—cuddling!" writes Your Shot photographer John MacDonald. "With our boat passing close by, a couple of eyes were opened to check us out, but the cuddle remained."

PHOTOGRAPH BY JAMES MACDONALD, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A fallow deer strikes a somnolent pose.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERT CSALA, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A conspiracy of lemurs take a nap.

PHOTOGRAPH BY TONJA H., NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC 

A king penguin rests on the beach of Volunteer Point in the Falkland Islands.

PHOTOGRAPH BY NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

A fawn takes a midday rest in Waterton Park, Canada.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JULIA MELNYK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

 

Video Credit: National Geographic 

 

 

30 Apr 2018 by Lisa Scarpa

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